Alright, Mr. Stadel. We’ve Got Some Bacon Questions

Greetings, Mr. Stadel.  We know that you are very busy.  We appreciate your brief attention.  Rather than bombard you with tweets, we decided to bloggly address our questions and comments about your Bacon Estimates.

First of all, bravo.  You dedicated an entire section of your estimation180 blog to a culinary wonder some refer to as “meat candy.”  Even our vegan teacher felt compelled to engage us with these estimates.  (She says it is for the sake of the learning.)

Second, the time lapse videos of the cooking are pretty sweet.  Too bad the school internet wouldn’t stop buffering.  But nice touch, Mr. Stadel.  Nice touch.

A question:  Did you know that the percent decrease in length of bacon is 38% after cooking, but the percent decrease in width is only 23%?  We figured that out adapting your “percent error” formula to the uncooked/cooked bacon.  Do you have any initial thoughts about that discrepancy?  Is it bacon’s “fibrous” fat/meat striped makeup that allows it to shrink more in length than width, inch for inch?

Also, did you know that the percent decrease in time from the cold skillet to the pre-heated skillet is 29%?  That one was a little harder for us to calculate, because we figured out that we needed to convert the cooking times to seconds rather than minutes and seconds.

To summarize, we wanted to thank you, Mr. Stadel.  Our teacher tells us that you dedicate your time and energy to the estimation180 site so that WE don’t have to learn math out of a textbook.  We wanted to tell you that we appreciate it.  And the bacon.  We appreciate the homage paid to bacon.

Sincerely,

Mrs. Schmidt’s Math Class

St. Francis, MN

2 Comments

  1. Hi everyone,
    Thanks for the kind words and fun questions.
    1. Did you know that the percent decrease in length of bacon is 38% after cooking, but the percent decrease in width is only 23%?
    No, I did not find the actual percent decrease, but I did notice the length decreases more than the width. Either way, any decrease in bacon is a shame, right?

    2. Do you have any initial thoughts about that discrepancy?
    I’m going out on a limb here and saying it has something to do with the rigidity of the meat and fat and the way it’s cut from the pig. I’m sure there’s a more scientific explanation, but again, bacon loss is sad.

    3. Did you know that the percent decrease in time from the cold skillet to the pre-heated skillet is 29%?
    I’m glad you have a class of bacon mathematicians crunching these numbers for us.
    My response to this question is another question: If I want to eat the initial batch of bacon as fast as possible, should I go with the cold skillet method, or wait until the skillet is pre-heated before placing those first bacon strips in there?

    I want to know what you think.

    Thanks again for the words of appreciation. Glad you guys enjoy it!

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